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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2023  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-6

Healthcare workers’ willingness to report to work during a pandemic in southeastern Nigeria: A hypothetical case using Ebola virus disease


1 Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Medicine, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Chioma A Onyedinma
Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Enugu, Enugu State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmh.IJMH_63_22

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Background: The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak of 2014–2016 in West Africa was the world’s deadliest to date, and the World Health Organization declared it an international health emergency. It adversely affected the health system with many healthcare workers (HCWs) being worried about going to work. Objective: This study therefore aimed at determining the willingness of HCWs to report to work in an outbreak of EVD. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured, self-administered, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 360 doctors, nurses, and medical laboratory workers in public and private health facilities in Enugu Metropolis. Results: Seventy-three percent (73%) of our respondents were willing to report to work during an outbreak of EVD. Nurses were about five times more likely to be willing to work than other categories of staff [odd ratio (OR) = 4.999; confidence interval (CI)= 2.15–11.597; P < 0.001] and female HCWs were about 1.3 times more likely to be willing to work than males during an EVD outbreak (OR =1.275; CI=0.743–2.815; P = 0.049). Availability of vaccination for healthcare staff (88.6%) and family members (79.2%) were the greatest personal and family-related motivating factors for willingness to work, whereas the provision of antiviral treatment for staff with unprotected exposure to an ill patient (78.1%) was the greatest work motivating factor. However, passion for work surpassed increased remuneration (61.4%) as a personal motivating factor for HCWs willingness to report to work during an EVD outbreak. Conclusion: Our study showed that HCWs were largely willing to work during an EVD outbreak. Personal vaccination for staff and family members and provision of antivirals were the major motivating factors.


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