• Users Online: 327
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2023  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 19-24

Assessment of resilience in the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic: A snapshot of experiences of adolescents secondary school children in southeast Nigeria


1 Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu State, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Nigeria
3 Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Josephat M Chinawa
Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu State
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmh.IJMH_40_22

Rights and Permissions

Background: The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic has created much psychological burden on the adolescent child. Resilience is an intertwine of risk and protective factors that may help the adolescent child in growth and development. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors that influence resilience among adolescents attending secondary schools in southeast Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 496 adolescent students who attend six secondary schools in Enugu city. Results: The majority of the respondents, 79.4%, feel safe when they are with their families. A high proportion of the respondents, 61.5%, were resilient. A comparable proportions of male (59.9%) and female (62.9%) respondents were resilient. (χ2=0.476, P = 0.490). A significantly higher proportion of respondents who were in junior secondary three class, 70.5%, were resilient when compared with those in senior secondary three class, 59.4% (χ2=4.050, P = 0.044). The highest proportion of respondents who had strong social support, 75.8%, were resilient, whereas those who had poor social support were the least, 36.6%. The observed difference was statistically significant (χ2=39.995, P < 0.001). The respondents who had poor social support were about six times less likely to be resilient when compared with those who had strong social support [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=0.177, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.099–0.317]. Also, the respondents who had moderate social support were about three times less likely to be resilient when compared with those who had strong social support (AOR=0.369, 95%CI: 0.261–0.601). Conclusion: Resilience in adolescents is enhanced by education, being in junior secondary class, good family structure, and strong social support.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed262    
    Printed30    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded34    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal