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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 128-134

Childhood brain tumors in Southern Nigeria: A multicenter experience


1 Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria/Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Enugu State, Nigeria
2 Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria/Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Enugu State, Nigeria
3 Department of Histopathology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria/Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Enugu State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ndubuisi Anyele Uwaezuoke
Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu.
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmh.IJMH_24_20

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Background: Childhood brain tumors (CBTs) constitute 5% of all childhood tumors and can involve any part of the brain disrupting brain structure, form, and function with associated high morbidity and mortality. The objectives of the study were to determine the clinicopathologic pattern and treatment outcome of brain tumor in children in our setting. Materials and Methods: A 3-year prospective multicenter observational study of children with brain tumors was undertaken. Relevant patients’ clinical data sought, included histological diagnosis, World Health Organization grade and survival pattern. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21.0, whereas the level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Study participants were aged 2–16 (mean 7.93 ± 4.21) years. Fifteen were female (51.7%). The duration between; illness to presentation, presentation to confirmation of diagnosis, and from presentation to specific treatment were 4.40 ± 4.40, 5.0 ± 4.0, and 6.3 ± 6.0 months, respectively.Cerebellar tumors occurred most commonly 15 (51.7%). Majority of the cases, 21 (72.4%) were low grade. Central nervous tumor was first suspected in eight cases (27.6%) at the referring center. Eleven (37.9%) and ten (34.5%) patients, respectively, survived at 1 year and 3 years of follow-up post-diagnosis. The most common complication was hydrocephalus 12(41.4%). Mortality occurred in seven (21.4%) patients arising from their brain tumors. Conclusion: Poor knowledge of health care providers in referring centers, along with delay in initiating treatment contributed to mortality and morbidity.


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