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ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 56-65

Prevalence and risk factors for schistosomiasis in a rural community of South-East Nigeria


1 Department of Community Medicine; Department of Health Administration and Management, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu-campus, Enugu, Nigeria
2 Department of Health Administration and Management, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu-campus, Enugu, Nigeria
3 Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria
4 Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu-campus, Enugu, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
B S C Uzochukwu
Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu-campus
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Aim: The study determined the prevalence and factors associated with Schistosomiasis infection among primary school pupils in Agulu community in Anambra state Nigeria as it is important to identify communities at high risk of infection and assess effectiveness of control programs. Methods: Using a questionnaire, information on history of passing bloody urine and known risk factors associated with infection was collected from 984 pupils. Their urine and stool samples were also examined for S. hematobium and mansoni eggs. Results: More than half (57.1%) of the pupils were males and a majority of them belong to the age group of 8-13 years. While 14.5% of them have noticed snails in their popular stream, 21.3%, 6.9% and 20.3% have had pains while urinating, passed blood in urine and passed blood in stool respectively. Schistosome hematobium eggs were found in the urine of 16.4% of the pupils . Prevalence in schools ranged from 0.0% to 25.6%. The prevalence of soil transmitted helminths (STH) were 10.9%, 2.4%, 0.8% and 0.1% for Hook worm, Ascaris, Trichuris trichuria and Enterobius vermicularis respectively. Gender, source of water in school and at home, bathing/playing in the stream were significantly associated with S. hematobium infection. There is also mixed infections with soil transmitted helminthes (STH) Conclusions: The prevalence of S. hematobium infection is still high in the study area and there is also mixed infections with STH. This local estimate of the prevalence is likely to be more useful than national estimates in planning and implementation of control interventions at community level.


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